Claiming a share of the $31 billion

Electronic or E-learning, what’s the big deal? A conversation with my brother about Facebook and how he wants no part of what he refers to as that “Computer B@#-S@&*#. I must refrain from using the colorful language he uses to describe an industry where US consumers spent in excess of $31 billion in 2008. And over $62.5 globally on mobile e-Learning. 

In a scene in the movie Wall Street,  Michael Douglas makes reference to a bitter sweet moment where he compares a business deal he makes with an advisory to watching his mother-in-law go off a cliff in his new Maserati.I felt the same way after reading Mobile e-Learning Stocks: U.S. Education, Unemployment, and Baby-Boomer Evolution. I found out that my decision to change my career path after 15 years to pursue a masters degree in Education Media Design & Technology was dead on correct however in the same article I found out that I may now be considered a “Baby Boomer“, although based on the research I conducted I am one year shy of being placed in that category. 

“Don’t you know, there is no money in education!” I beg to differ. Not only is there money in education, there is growth potential that could bring the US out from under their recession/depression. If United States doesn’t recognize that more money needs to be invested into education and e-Learning, our economic crisis will not only get worst it could be detrimental to our position in the global market. Global Economic Competition has in essence decrease the size of the playing field and it looks as though the U.S. could see a down grade in it position the “line up”. If there isn’t a significant and deliberate overhauls to the US education system it could be a matter of national security.

It amazes me how we as Americans boast about being the greatest country in the world yet we have some many serious flaws in our armor. Educating its people to compete in world markets should be a priority it’s a necessity.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Claiming a share of the $31 billion

  1. Nice post. And you are right. It is not just education, we all need to learn new skills to keep up with the world. In Finland and Switzerland most everyone goes to school online. It is government sponsored education, but everyone is encouraged to learn something new. Learning does not stop when you are out of school anymore.

    PS. It is not so bad being a boomer. We are one of the fastest growing groups of people who are using these tools. Most of us are going to have to delay our retirements and work many more years. So why not do something new, something that we may enjoy more.

  2. Just wanted you to know that in 2009-2010 the US Government (129 different agencies) decided that it needs to change most all of its learning which is on paper or some type of legacy software program to SCORM based education material. I know this because I scour government contract requests and go to some of the “contract fairs”. The contracts requests for proposals started last year around October. Most of these contracts range from a couple of hundred thousand to in the millions and require specialized teams who understand everything from boiler plates to rocket science and what does this have in common education/training. So make no mistake, if you can parlay what we are learning into a niche its the bucks! I am betting on green. No really learning about how to make everything green.lol What I mean to say is how to move towards helping businesses meet the standards of going green. Walmart did in in 2007-2008 and now Van Jones is leading the way. (He has extensive project knowledge.) So learn how to do something that will be profitable and then learn how to teach it which means education. Also, consulting is a very hot commodity. But you already knew all this that is why you are at Full Sail.

    • Thanks for the comment BriGette. My next question is since you are familiar with the process, how can we get a share of the $31 billion. Please point me in the right direction and I will take it from there. Thanks again.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s